Style Details

Name
Oud Bru­in
Cate­go­ry
Euro­pean Sour Ale
BJCP Style Code
23 C
Appearan­ce
Dark red­dish-brown to brown in color. Good cla­ri­ty. Average to good head reten­ti­on. Ivory to light tan head color.
Aro­ma
Com­plex com­bi­na­ti­on of frui­ty esters and rich malt cha­rac­ter. Medi­um to medi­um-high esters com­mon­ly remi­nis­cent of raisins, plums, figs, dates, black cher­ries or pru­nes. Medi­um low to medi­um high malt cha­rac­ter of cara­mel, tof­fee, oran­ge, treacle or cho­co­la­te. Spi­cy phe­nols can be pre­sent in low amounts for com­ple­xi­ty. A sher­ry-like cha­rac­ter may be pre­sent and gene­ral­ly deno­tes an aged examp­le. A low sour aro­ma may be pre­sent, and can modest­ly incre­a­se with age but should not grow to a noti­ce­ab­le acetic/vinegary cha­rac­ter. Hop aro­ma absent. Dia­ce­tyl is per­cei­ved only in very minor quan­ti­ties, if at all, as a com­ple­men­ta­ry aro­ma.
Fla­vour
Mal­ty with frui­ty com­ple­xi­ty and typi­cal­ly some cara­mel cha­rac­ter. Medi­um to medi­um-high frui­ti­ness com­mon­ly inclu­des dark or dried fruit such as raisins, plums, figs, dates, black cher­ries or pru­nes. Medi­um low to medi­um high malt cha­rac­ter of cara­mel, tof­fee, oran­ge, treacle or cho­co­la­te. Spi­cy phe­nols can be pre­sent in low amounts for com­ple­xi­ty. A slight sour­ness often beco­mes more pro­noun­ced in well-aged examp­les, along with some sher­ry-like cha­rac­ter, pro­du­cing a “sweet-and-sour” pro­fi­le. The sour­ness should not grow to a nota­ble acetic/vinegary cha­rac­ter. Hop fla­vor absent. Restrai­ned hop bit­ter­ness. Low oxi­da­ti­on is appro­pria­te as a point of com­ple­xi­ty. Dia­ce­tyl is per­cei­ved only in very minor quan­ti­ties, if at all, as a com­ple­men­ta­ry fla­vor. Balan­ce is mal­ty, but with frui­ti­ness and sour­ness pre­sent. Sweet and tart finish
Mouth­feel
Medi­um to medi­um-full body. Low to mode­ra­te car­bo­na­ti­on. No astrin­gen­cy.
Over­all Impres­si­on
A mal­ty, frui­ty, aged, some­what sour Bel­gi­an-style brown ale.
Typi­cal Ingre­dients
A base of Pils malt with judi­cious amounts of dark cara mal­ts and a tiny bit of black or roast malt. Often inclu­des mai­ze. Low alpha acid con­ti­nen­tal hops are typi­cal (avoid high alpha or dis­tinc­ti­ve Ame­ri­can hops). Sac­charo­my­ces and Lac­to­ba­c­il­lus (and ace­to­bac­ter) con­tri­bu­te to the fer­men­ta­ti­on and even­tu­al fla­vor. Lac­to­ba­c­il­lus reacts poor­ly to ele­va­ted levels of alco­hol. Water high in car­bo­na­tes is typi­cal of its home regi­on and will buf­fer the aci­di­ty of dar­ker mal­ts and the lac­tic sour­ness. Magne­si­um in the water accen­tua­tes the sour­ness.
Histo­ry
An “old ale” tra­di­ti­on, indi­ge­nous to East Flan­ders, typi­fied by the pro­ducts of the Lief­man bre­we­ry (now owned by Riva), which has roots back to the 1600s. His­to­ri­cal­ly bre­wed as a “pro­vi­si­on beer” that would deve­lop some sour­ness as it aged. The­se beers were typi­cal­ly more sour than cur­rent com­mer­cial examp­les. While Flan­ders red beers are aged in oak, the brown beers are warm aged in stain­less steel.
Comments
Long aging and blen­ding of young and aged beer may occur, adding smooth­ness and com­ple­xi­ty and balan­cing any har­sh, sour cha­rac­ter. This style was desi­gned to lay down so examp­les with a mode­ra­te aged cha­rac­ter are con­si­de­red supe­ri­or to youn­ger examp­les. As in fruit lam­bics, Oud Bru­in can be used as a base for fruit-fla­vo­r­ed beers such as kriek (cher­ries) or fram­bo­zen (raspber­ries), though the­se should be ent­e­red in the Clas­sic-Style Fruit Beer cate­go­ry.
Com­mer­cial Examp­les
Ich­te­gem Oud Bru­in, Lief­mans Gou­den­band, Lief­mans Lief­mans Oud Bru­in, Petrus Oud Bru­in, Riva Von­del, Van­derg­hins­te Bel­le­gems Bru­in
Ori­gi­nal Gra­vi­ty
1.040 - 1.074 SG
Final Gra­vi­ty
1.008 - 1.012 SG
Color
15 - 22 SRM
Alco­hol
4.0 - 8.0 %vol
Bit­ter­ness
20 - 25 IBU